New Computer Virus Destroys Entire Harddrive

The most deadly computer virus to hit yet…

Computer geeks and users everywhere are frantically trying to find a defense against their computer’s latest and most deadly threat. Computers Weekly recently announced the outbreak of the Anaconda Virus- a virus that slowly infects your computer’s hard drive and once it is “surrounded”, attacks all files and programs. Hence, Anaconda Virus.

The source of the virus has not been identified and/or traced. As uncomforting as it is, computer scientists have not been able to find a definite solution or prevention for the virus. The Anaconda Virus, according to its victims, has gotten on their computers in numerous ways. Emails have been opened up from what looked like Powerpoint presentations from their boss, links were clicked from who they thought were friends on Facebook, and the virus was even downloaded directly in what the user thought was an MP3 file from the Internet. The virus takes many forms and is almost impossible to predict.

Once on the victim’s hard drive, the virus not only corrupts and destroys the user’s files, but plants a keystokes monitor. This allows the virus to record the user’s keystokes and send it to whoever originally sent the virus. In other words, it records any passwords, credit card information, or emails you type before it attacks your computer. After 48 hours of monitoring your computer’s keystrokes, it sends its information, and begins to destroy your computer. Songs, videos, pictures, documents and all other files are all destroyed. It seems that no is protected from the Anaconda Virus.

If you couldn’t tell, there is no real Anaconda Virus. You can stop peeing yourself now.  However, what if there was? Are you protected? Are you as safe as you think you are online? Think about it.

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